1983 renault le car




1983 renault le car

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  • With that in mind, have a gander at this Renault R5, known to American Francophiles as the Le Car. Now, this isn't a mid-engine R5.

    By the mid 's, Americans were just getting used to the ideal of a small car. The first fuel crisis of the early part of the decade would warm.

    History of the logo. The Renault logo has an interesting history. During the First World War, the company successfully produced light tanks. In connection with the popularity of the company's tanks, the leadership of Renault even changed the logo, placing in it the image of his tank. But the tank on the emblem was not delayed for a long time, in 1923 a well-known form of diamond appeared. However, this is not a diamond - it is a trace from the tank.

    Your Renault 5 and Le Car First thing I did was take off the Le Car decals, not a big fan. I love driving it Competed at the SCCA Runoffs in Finished 3rd.

    1983 renault le car

    1983 renault le car

    In the Monte Carlo, Renault 5 Alpines came second and third overall, despite a powerful team entry from Fiat and Lancia. The first fuel crisis of the early part of the decade would warm reluctant Americans to the concept. At no point does it actually feel cheap, a quality that has eluded far more recent imports from across various ponds. It was named the Renault 5 Turbo , but being mid-engined and rear wheel drive, this car bore little technical resemblance to the road-going version.

    1983 renault le car

    1983 renault le car

    1983 renault le car

    1983 renault le car

    1983 renault le car

    The Renault 5 as it was meant to be | Autoweek

    The Renault 5 is a supermini manufactured and marketed by Renault over two generations — also called R5 and — also called Super 5 or Supercinq. The Renault 5 achieved cult status, [3] becoming the best-selling car in France from , with a total production exceeding 5. Images and details of the Renault 5 were published on 10 December , the car's formal launch following on 28 January The R5 featured a steeply sloping rear hatchback and front dashboard.

    It was launched onto the right-hand drive UK market in the autumn of , where alongside the recently launched Fiat it competed as an imported but more modern alternative to British Leyland's Mini and Chrysler Europe's Hillman Imp ; there was still no competitor in this sector of the market from Ford or Vauxhall.

    1983 renault le car

    The 5 narrowly missed out on the European Car of the Year award, which was instead given to the Audi The R5 borrowed mechanicals from the similarly popular Renault 4 , using a longitudinally-mounted engine driving the front wheels with torsion bar suspension. OHV engines were borrowed from the Renault 4 and larger Renault 8: It was one of the first modern superminis, which capitalised on the new hatchback design, which Renault had patented on its R16 , launched in It was launched a year after the booted version of the Fiat , and during the same year that the became available with a hatchback.

    The R5 was launched three years before the Volkswagen Polo and Vauxhall Chevette , and four years before the Ford Fiesta - new superminis which met the growing demand for this type of car in Western Europe. British Leyland was working on a new modern supermini during the s, but the end product - the Austin Metro - was not launched until Although the mechanical components came from earlier models, body construction involved floor sections welded together with the other body panels, resulting in a monocoque structure.

    1983 renault le car

    The monocoque structure reduced the car's weight, but required investment in new production processes. In , it was priced in France at below 10, francs. The early production R5 used a dashboard-mounted gearshift, linked by a rod which ran over the top of the engine to a single bend where the rod turned downwards and linked into the gearbox, which was positioned directly in front of the engine.

    A floor-mounted lever employing a cable linkage replaced this arrangement in At the time, the automatic usually represented just under five percent of overall Renault 5 production.

    The R5 was one of the first cars produced with plastic polyester and glass fibre bumpers, which came from a specialist Renault factory at Dreux. Other versions of the first generation included the four-door saloon version called the Renault 7 and built by FASA-Renault of Spain , where virtually all examples were sold.

    1983 renault le car

    A five-door R5 was added to the range in , making it one of the first cars of its size to feature four passenger doors. In March , the automatic received a somewhat more powerful 1. The Renault 5 Alpine was one of the first hot-hatches , launched in - going on sale two months before the original Volkswagen Golf GTI and two years after the Simca Ti.

    The right-hand drive version was shown at the British Motor Show in and was officially on sale from 4th April in the UK and was sold as the Renault 5 Gordini because Chrysler Europe already had the rights to the name " Alpine " in the UK and it had just been introduced on the Chrysler Alpine UK version of Simca at the time. This and the later Alpine Turbo models were assembled at Alpine 's Dieppe plant, beginning in The larger engine and its various performance parts meant that the spare tire could no longer fit there and was relocated to the boot.

    Original Renault R5 (non-Turbo) Test Drive



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